Tag Archive: blog


I’m not sure that you noticed it, but this blog has a new name which fits best its content, and some tweaks were also made for you to navigate easily in a “target-reader free” blog.

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Holiday break!

I will be away from today, Sunday, until september 25th, yet I’ll post from Plinky though.

(Feel free to browse through the old entries, and let me know what you would like to read about).

Happy 1st Birthday, Blog!

I just realized that I really started blogging exactly a year ago.

I didn’t change a thing since I began, so you can see how it began.

I was inspired by Angela Lussier and her mind-crunching book The Anti-resumé Revolution.

I eventually had a talk with her and became the european head honcho of The Anti-résumé revolution — just a résumé which is anything but a dull white page of paper— and started this blog to keep my audience updated on the boiling ideas coming their way.

I never changed my blog’s subtitle, but re-named it Commonplace as I thought the blog was delving into many more topics than just staffing/job hunting/hiring.

It is also a reference made to Michel de Montaigne who was always keeping with him a book of daily thoughts, questions, learning, etc for further reading and thinking. Something that would be commonplace for him.

This morning, I read Seth Godin’s blog and mulled upon it for a while.

Why did I started blogging in the first place? Simply put: I love writing, especially on my iPhone or iPad. Just writing and redefining writing with each post.

There is no competition with other bloggers. There is cooperation instead, and I really wish to see “self-centurd” blog owners begin to understand what a tribe, no matter how small it is, can do.

What’s on your agenda?

Today, as everyday, I’ve read Seth Godin’s blog.

His ability of making us aware of the opportunities, which are more than often what we overlook or take for granted, is mind-bending.

Here’s one thing I know, but having been freshly reminded about it, I think it’s the right time to share it.

How much personal is your agenda?

Chances are that it is not about you, but about doing things for others.

Being helpful is alright, but being a slave is not.

Read Seth’s take on agendas.

Write as you talk.

You’ll certainly agree that as we talk (and we talk a lot), we get better over time.

Seth Godin wrote about this in his blog. I shamelessly borrow the idea that there is no talker’s block.

Why is it then, that we face the writer’s block?

My take is that we don’t write enough.

It’s not about writing a best death-seller here (best-seller means as much to me as original recipe on a tomato sauce jar). No: it’s about doing with writing what we do with talking.

We do it a lot, and every word we say is not worth a Nobel Prize or a Pulitzer one. That’s fine.

Since I started this blog, I wrote like I talk. Not as much, but the same way.
I don’t care about quality and relevance for each word. I don’t care about quantity either.
Those are short-term concepts, and I’m all about long-term, even if you can’t see or feel it.

If I was that much anal about what I do, I’ll be into math and do Fourier transform the whole day, and perhaps the whole night, just for the sake of being right everytime when I’ll be an incredibly well trained monkey.

What I do care about (I know it’s selfish to you, but that is the truth you’ll have to face here, not your wishes) is writing enough to someday achieve a higher level of writing.

It is possible by putting enough time and effort into something that may be really meaningful, really strong. Something that matters.

It will take time and a shitload of other posts to perhaps write a brilliant trait. I’m ready for it.

You’ll certainly skip many posts because they don’t resonate. I won’t get all pissy pants if my reader stats are poor.

I know what I want, I know the outcome, and I know you’ll like it.

(Edit: if you’re part of the 90% who read Seth’s blog but don’t buy his books, you’ve totally missed the point and you should be ashamed. Yes, the blog is free. Tons of things are for free and the mass loves free stuff… but books are meant to be more than a commodity. They’re a legacy, not just a way to rake in some bucks.)

Short, sharp and smart.

This is the beginning of a burst of nano-blogs made of one sentence only.